Can conditional cash transfers improve the uptake of nutrition interventions and household food security? Evidence from Odisha’s Mamata Scheme

While there is considerable global evidence on the efficacy of cash transfers in improving health and nutrition outcomes, the evidence from South Asia, and in particular, India, is limited. Most of the available evidence on India comes from studies on the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY), which has been credited with increasing the number of institutional >> Read more

Deploying the Power of Social Protection to Improve Nutrition: What Will It Take?

Despite reasonable economic growth over the past decade or more, the nutritional status of women and children in India continues to be poor. Social protection programmes are ideal vehicles for tackling this problem, and improving the underlying determinants of malnutrition. Not only are they designed to target families at risk of malnutrition, but they are >> Read more

Double-burden of malnutrition in India: A growing threat

India is undergoing a rapid socio-economic, demographic, nutritional and health transition. While the country is still grappling with issues of poverty, undernutrition and communicable diseases, it is increasingly facing additional challenges related to obesity and a rise in the prevalence of non-communicable diseases like diabetes and high blood pressure, especially in urban areas. POSHAN has >> Read more

Trends in Nutrition Outcomes, Determinants, and Interventions in India (2006–2016)

Nutrition is central to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of the 2030 Agenda, and at least 12 of the 17 SDGs include indicators relevant for nutrition. In addition, the World Health Assembly unanimously endorsed 6 ambitious maternal, infant, and young child nutrition targets and several noncommunicable disease-related targets to be achieved by 2025. These global targets are >> Read more

Why India Must Confront Its Nutrition Problems Now

Source: IFPRI Blog. Five years have passed since the World Health Assembly endorsed a set of six global nutrition targets to be achieved by 2025 in order to improve maternal, infant and young child nutrition across the world. The six targets are: 40 percent reduction in prevalence of childhood stunting, 50 percent reduction in anemia >> Read more